DUH: Why People Would Jump Off A Cliff If Trump Asked

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What is wrong with people? When they get around Donald Trump, their brains just leak out of their heads. He might be the cause of chronic pain or the loss of all their money, but people still adore him. They might sue him, after physical injury and lose. Yet, people believe he is the answer to all this country’s ills.

Patrick Vincent, 83, of New Jersey said he fell down some stairs at the Taj Mahal casino in 2013 and injured his arm seriously. Since then, he has seen several physicians and had physical therapy, but no luck. The elderly man says:

‘My arm turned completely black. It’s still not the same.’

His attorney sued for $175,000 for personal injury pain and suffering, but a Trump bankruptcy in 2014 prevented him from winning. Trump filed bankruptcy for Trump Plaza Associates, which ran the casino where Vincent’s injury occurred. Vincent continued:

‘I lost $175,000 and I’m a poor man, but I love him. We got a lot of retards in this county, but Donald Trump is the man who is going to help the people… I ain’t going against him.’

Political psychologist and CEO of the Rossi Psychological Group Dr. Bart Rossi said:

‘The person’s belief system trumps everything else in their thinking. In other words, it’s more important—their ideology—because they relate to that person and that’s more important than themselves… they will like that person come hell or high water.

Or take Carmella Worton, who lives in Toms River, New Jersey. In 2008, she caught the heel of her shoe on a frayed stair rug, which flipped her down the stairwell. As a result of the fall, she injured the meniscus in her knee. She also injured her jaw and was left with the very painful TMJ (temporomandibular joint dysfunction.)

Trump didn’t push her, but it was his name on the door. She filed a $100,000 claim, but since Trump Entertainment Resorts filed bankruptcy in 2009, she only received $5,000. Worton told The Daily Beast:

‘Yes, he owes me money.’

Not only that, she is in aggravated, permanent pain due to the knee injury. She couldn’t afford to complete her medical treatment, so she faces “permanent problems.” Yet, she said:

‘I love the man.’

She thinks Trump owes her some serious money, and she is a registered Democrat, but Wooten somehow believes the orange man would be the best president ever:

‘I don’t care what he owes me. That’s irrelevant to what I feel about him in the long run… if [filing bankruptcy is] what the guy had to do, that’s what he needed to do. He’s still a survivor, and still is on top.’

For some reason, Worton thinks that a man who cheated her out of money and caused pain is worthy of the title “President.” What makes her believe he has the qualities that would take the country back to its better years is beyond reason. She said:

‘Him being in power will change a lot for America. We need to make America whole. We are not whole, we are nothing, we are a nobody.’

‘You go and talk to your cable company, you’re talking to another country. This country has allowed outsourcing to take American jobs away.’

‘He’s a real true blue American. He doesn’t care about the overseas. He doesn’t care about friendliness—enough of the friendliness.’

University of New York professor Dr. Stanley Renshon is a specialist in the psychology of political behavior. He told The Daily Beast:

‘It’s your individual self-interest versus the country as a whole—and that’s the definition of patriotism, to put the country before yourself.’

‘A lot of people who support Trump or are open to his ideas, without necessarily supporting him personally, are people who are very concerned about the direction of this country and want to do something about it… they are upset with Trump with a person, but they believe that this country is going to hell in a handbasket.’

Or maybe, these people landed on their heads when they fell and have severe brain damage.

Featured Image: Gage Skidmore via Flickr, Creative Commons License.

H/T: Daily Beast

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