Navy: If Armed Civilians Show Up At Recruiting Centers, We Won’t Be There

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After armed civilians began showing up at military recruitment centers, a  Navy official responded by saying they can show up, but no one will be there. In short, they will be guarding outside of an empty building to protect people that aren’t there.

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Q 13 Fox reports:

The official told CNN that that should unauthorized armed civilians attempt to patrol outside a Navy recruiting center, recruitment personnel would try to work out of the office. They could choose to spend the day at a school, mall, on travel or other duties that would keep them away from the center.

The official noted, however, that so far only one or two of these armed civilians have shown up following the shooting at a Chattanooga, Tennessee, recruiting center Thurday that left five servicemen dead.

Armed civilians have been standing guard outside a military recruiting office in a Spanaway, Washington shopping center.

Earlier Wednesday, Department of Defense spokesman Capt. Jeff Davis reiterated the existing department policy of not supporting arming all military personnel in comments to reporters.

Lawmakers and elected officials at the national, state and local levels have proposed changing the policy following the deadly shooting Thursday.

“We do not support arming all military personnel,” Davis said.

The Marine Corps put out a statement on Tuesday saying, “While we greatly appreciate the support of the American public during this tragedy, we ask that citizens do not stand guard at our recruiting offices. Our continued public trust lies among our trained first responders for the safety of the communities where we live and work.”

Heavily armed militia members have been standing guard at recruitment centers reportedly in response to the killing of four unarmed Marines and a sailor in Chattanooga, Tenn., by a lone gunman, who was later killed by police.



In Savannah, Georgia, one man was asked by police to put his shotgun away because people were becoming nervous at the shopping center where he was guarding a military recruitment center.

There is “always some concern about safety for our soldiers and civilians when someone is walking around with weapons,” an official said.

While their intentions may be good, it’s probably hard for the military to differentiate the good guys with a gun from the bad, just as it is for the public.

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H/T: FON’s very own Cyborg, with thanks.

Image: Times Free Press.

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