Texas Man With ‘White Power’ And ‘KKK’ Painted On His Fence Insists He’s Not Racist

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A Texas man painted ‘white power’ and ‘KKK’ on the corrugated steel surrounding his southeast Houston property in a predominately black neighborhood but he insists that he’s not a racist.

 

Burns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donald Burns admitted painting the offensive words on this fence and says, “This is called freedom of speech and it’s supposed to be offensive.”

“This is here because this is the reaction that I want,” Burns added.

Burns said he painted the incendiary words because he believes he’s been unfairly targeted with property restrictions by the area’s civic club, Click 2 Houston reports.

Burns said he painted the signs in order to draw attention to his plight, but he insists it’s not racism. Instead, he feels he’s being persecuted.

“Has nothing to do with race, it has a problem with black property owners and what they’ve got away with. It does have something to do with race,” said Burns.

“It’s very offensive,” said Joseph Boxie, the property owner and member of the civic club. “He’s totally out of control.”

Boxie explained that the restriction violations Burns received were over involve minor infractions like not mowing the grass.

“If you feel a certain way you don’t have to write all this on your fence, because you have kids come by here from school looking at this stuff,” said Sam Pratt.

Activist Quanell X was asked to step in to help in talking with Burns about the signs.

“What he’s doing is dangerous. Many of the young people in this community have a problem with that signage and he’s creating a very volatile situation,” said Quannel X.

Watch courtesy of Click 2 Houston:
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In a strange twist, some African-American residents in the neighborhood actually do support Burns and said it wasn’t about race.

“The Ku Klux Klan behavior has just changed colors,” said Burns. Burns took off his shirt to prove he had no white supremacist tattoos during his time in prison and introduced the reporter interviewing him to his African-American girlfriend.



“Since 1977 I’ve been in and out of your prisons, you don’t see no marks of that (expletive) hate on me,” said Burns.

“I don’t have an NAACP, I don’t have a LULAC. There’s no means for me to get something when I’m offended,” said Burns.

Certainly Mr. Burns can find a better way to make a point than by offending his own neighbors.

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