U.N. Officials: Excessive Force Used Against Native American DAPL Protesters Is ‘Inhuman’

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The abuse perpetrated against Native Americans who oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline has been noticed by United Nations’ officials who noted “the inhuman and degrading conditions” those arrested faced in detention. ” A United Nations human rights expert has accused US security forces of using excessive force against protesters trying to stop an oil pipeline project which runs through land sacred to indigenous people,” the statement reads.

The Washington Post reports:

The official, Maini Kiai, is a reputed human rights lawyer from Kenya who also traveled to the United States this summer to survey mounting racial tensions in the lead-up to last week’s presidential election. His statement on the protests in North Dakota, which are largely being carried out by Native Americans, was endorsed by a slew of other high-ranking U.N. officials, including special rapporteurs on drinking water, the environment, free speech, cultural rights and the rights of indigenous peoples.

“Tensions have escalated in the past two weeks, with local security forces employing an increasingly militarized response to protests and forcibly moving encampments located near the construction site,” Kiai said.

“This is a troubling response to people who are taking action to protect natural resources and ancestral territory in the face of profit-seeking activity,” he noted. “The excessive use of State security apparatus to suppress protest against corporate activities that are alleged to violate human rights is wrong and contrary to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.”

“I call on the Pipeline Company to pause all construction activity within 20 miles east and west of Lake Oahe,” he added.

The strongly worded statement continues to say:

Construction of the pipeline has continued despite a call in September by the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, and other experts for it to be halted.

The 1,172-mile (1,890km) pipeline, designed to carry crude oil to a refinery near Chicago, is being built by Energy Transfer and the US Army Corps of Engineers.

Protesters say several sacred sites of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe have already been bulldozed, and construction work is nearing the Missouri River, which is held sacred.

Corporations are not people, by the way. If this corporation was a person, it should be given polluted water to drink because the construction poses a threat to the quality of the drinking water.

And on Monday, the federal government told Energy Transfer Partners and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which opposes the construction, that a review was complete and the route needed more study before the pipeline construction can cross underneath the Missouri River.

Featured image: Screen capture via Unicorn Riot

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